What’s wrong with Illinois’ plan to prevent nursing home abuse

A new law proposed in Illinois would permit the use of cameras in nursing homes to monitor patient care.

The use of the cameras would be voluntary, although there are questions about obtaining consent from elderly residents, their visitors, and the nursing home staff.

Nursing home safety (if you can afford it)

Patients and their families would have to purchase and set up the equipment themselves, and then monitor the footage.

In this plan, a patient’s safety is contingent upon their ability to finance and install an expensive surveillance system. Many senior citizens in long-term care facilities (which are hugely expensive) can’t afford that.

Additionally, this plan assumes that there are family members who are willing and able to watch hours of video footage on a regular basis.

Who’s in charge here?

Families should be allowed to monitor the care of elderly relatives. “Granny cams” have recorded elder abuse in other cases.

And there’s a good argument that the mere presence of a camera would decrease the risk of nursing home abuse: surveillance in itself changes behavior.

But should the State of Illinois place the burden of ensuring nursing home safety on the patients themselves?

Nursing home abuse and neglect is a big problem. Illinois received a failing grade in a national study released in May 2014. Voluntary surveillance captured and monitored by those who can afford it may help, but overall, this plan does not come close to solving the problem.

About Kevin
Kevin Coluccio was recently named one of the Top 10 Super Lawyers in Washington State. He has long history of successful elder abuse/neglect cases and has a stellar reputation for getting results for his injury clients in serious car crashes, pedestrian accidents, trucking accidents, maritime claims, and asbestos injury cases.