nursing home abuse

How to file complaint against a nursing home: 4 easy steps

Too often, people wait until an elderly person is seriously or fatally injured before registering a nursing home complaint.

If you even suspect that nursing home residents are being neglected, abused, or been treated improperly, you can—and should—file an official complaint to alert state authorities to investigate.

4 steps to filing a complaint:

1. Write it down. Get the facts down on paper as quickly as you can: it’s much easier than trying to remember the details later.

2. Fill out the investigation form. Medicare has contact info for every state agency charged with investigating malpractice, abuse and neglect complaints. You can remain anonymous in the report, but give them as much information as you can, including:

  • Date and time of the incident;
  • Address of the facility, and location within it (cafeteria, hallway, etc.);
  • Your description of what happened (this is where your notes come in handy).

3. Send it in. Mail, email, fax, or even call, but file the form as soon as possible. The sooner you file, the sooner the problem can be addressed.

4. Follow up. A representative should contact you; ask to be notified when the final report is complete.

You don’t have to wait for an incident or an injury.

File a complaint if you know about unsanitary or unsafe conditions, or chronic understaffing in an elder care facility.

According to the Washington State Department of Health, our state investigates all claims involving:

  • Patient abuse or neglect
  • Staff not available to provide care
  • Failure to provide care
  • Providing the wrong care
  • Medication errors or mistakes
  • Unsafe, unclean or dangerous areas in the facility
  • Patient injuries or falls
  • Not following medical orders
  • Improperly prepared food
  • Not responding to a patient complaint

Click here to file a nursing home complaint in Washington

If you need help with this process, contact Coluccio Law for a free consultation.

Increasing Acceptance of "Granny Cams"

Most of us have heard of nanny cams. Now, the tiny hidden cameras, used for parents who are suspicious of their nannies, are gaining greater acceptance as a way to stop elder abuse or nursing home abuse.

A video still shows a nursing home aide stuffing latex gloves into Eryetha Mayberry’s mouth

A video still shows a nursing home aide stuffing latex gloves into Eryetha Mayberry’s mouth

According to the NY Times’ Well blog, Doris Racher decided to use a granny cam to catch a petty thief who was stealing from her mother, a 96-year-old dementia nursing home patient.

Instead of catching the thief, Doris found an aide stuffing latex gloves into her mother’s mouth, while another taunted her, tapping her on the head, laughing.

Despite concerns about privacy, some state attorney generals have used hidden cameras to go after some suspected of nursing home patient abuse and neglect.

In June, Mike DeWine, the Ohio state attorney general, announced that his office, with permission from families, had placed cameras in residents’ rooms in an unspecified number of state facilities. Mr. DeWine has moved to shut down at least one facility, in Zanesville, where, he said, cameras caught actions like an aide’s repeatedly leaving a stroke patient’s food by his incapacitated side.

As for the Mayberry story, there is now a new Oklahoma law that allows cameras in residents’ rooms if consent forms are filed to notify the facility, according to prior coverage by News9. The law gives the family exclusive rights to the recording and allows it to be used in court.

 

About Kevin

Kevin Coluccio was recently named one of the Top 10 Super Lawyers in Washington State. He has long history of successful elder abuse/neglect cases and has a stellar reputation for getting results for his injury clients in serious car crashes, pedestrian accidents, trucking accidents, maritime claims, and asbestos injury cases.